Broncos, Briefly: Monday, Feb. 18, 2019

"[I]t never waned from Day One to the time I was cut. That love never stopped. That’s one thing I felt when I got there. Even before I got to the Broncos, you always like felt everything was going to be OK; they were going to take care of you, no matter what."

Can Flacco rediscover his playoff groove at 34 years old? If he does, it would hardly be unprecedented. We rank the 9 Hall of Fame quarterbacks, in order, who had impressive final chapters in their career.

Cornerback: It should be the Broncos’ top priority because Chris Harris can’t cover three guys at once. Younger than 30 are Chicago’s Bryce Callahan (27 and played for Vic Fangio), Cincinnati’s Darqueze Dennard (27) and the New York Jets’ Morris Claiborne (29).

“His speed, obviously, is off the charts,” Riley said. “He’ll be the fastest quarterback in the NFL by a longshot the day he walks in the door. But on top of that, I think the things as a runner and athletically he brings, and his elite quickness, will be important. And then he just has a feel. He knows how to play the game. He knows when the moments are big and he needs to strain to get a first down. He’s not going to take unnecessary hits. He’s kind of got the body to withstand a few, but I almost compare him—I know this is high praise—but I mean, it’s almost kind of like a Barry Sanders effect. Yes I’m small for the position but I’m so athletic and so smart that I just rarely take big shots. Kyler took a lot less hits even than Baker did. A lot less. He was never really beat up after a game. The guy can stay healthy and he’s pretty smart. He’s got just a really, really unique skill set of having home-run speed but also home-run quickness to go with that.["]

NFL Draft Big Board: The Pre-Combine Top 50 (MMQB Staff, Sports Illustrated)

7. Dwayne Haskins, QB, Ohio State

For any viewers of ESPN’s late-morning programming, you could argue Haskins is “more of a runner than a thrower”—between trying to catch the bus, racing friends at recess in second grade, etc., over the course of his nearly 22 years on the planet he probably has run more than he’s thrown things. However, from a quarterbacking standpoint, he’s probably as close to a classic pocket passer as you’ll find among modern-era quarterbacks. Haskins is a power thrower with the willingness to test tight windows, and can get the ball into those tight spots with velocity even after he’s moved off his spot. He’s a quiet mover within the pocket, keeping his eyes downfield and moving through progressions with good tempo. He’s also a serviceable athlete who can pick up yards as an occasional scrambler and can probably be used—sparingly—on read-option plays. There’s always concern with one-year starters, as opponents haven’t had a chance to truly dissect their games and scheme to take away their strengths, but Haskins encouragingly bounced back from a mid-season lull and finished strong. He’s the top QB prospect in this class.

Advertising